• An Execution outside Newgate Prison, London -
    Price on request

    Pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil 
    18.3 by 26.8 cm., 7 by 10 1 /2 in. 

    Provenance: Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 3rd October 2001, lot 391; Private Collection until 2018 

    Rowlandson has depicted the huge crowds that filled every available vantage point on execution day, even climbing up the sides of buildings and onto the nearby roofs. Street sellers can be seen in the foreground, plying goods to the watching crowds. The austere mass of Newgate prison, visible behind the crowds of people, was built by George Dance the Younger. It was begun, on the site of an earlier prison, in 1770, but was badly damaged by fire during the Gordon Riots in 1780 and so extensively rebuilt and completed in 1782. On its completion, London’s gallows were moved from Tyburn to Newgate and every Monday morning large crowds would assemble outside. Another view of the same subject by Rowlandson is in the London Museum with another recorded in the collection of Desmond Coke.
  • The Masked Ball -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink over traces of pencil

    11.7 by 20.2 cm., 4 ½ by 8 in.

     

    This is a preliminary drawing, in reverse, for one of Rowlandson's twenty-six illustrations to William Combe's `The Dance of Life', published by Ackermann in 1817. The engraving is captioned: `The Mask, that scene of wanton Folly/May convert Mirth to Melancholy.'

  • Cornish Wrestling -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and grey wash over pencil on laid paper

    93 x 152 mm., 3 ¾ x 6 in.

     

    This is a preliminary sketch for an etching `Rural Sports: Cornish Wrestling' published in the `Sporting Magazine' periodical on 1st March 1800 by J. Wheble, Warwick Court.

  • The Harvesters -
    Price on request

    Bears signature lower right: T. Rowlandson.

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    240 x 188 mm., 9 ½ x 7 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance

    With Walker’s Galleries, London, 1955

    With Peppiatt Fine Art, 2014

    Private Collection, UK

     

    Literature

    Guy Peppiatt Fine Art, British Drawings and Watercolours, exhibition catalogue, 2014, no.18

  • The Game of Billiards -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    118 x 192 mm., 4 ½ x 7 ½ in.

     

    Provenance

    Mrs Caroline Scott, 1858

    With Spink and Son, London

    Private collection, U.K. until 2018

     

    Engraved

    As `By Gamblers linked in Folly's noose Play ill or well he's sure to lose', for Dances of Life, 1817, p.230

    This drawing dates to circa 1817. The player about to make a shot is using a mace, with which the ball was shoved rather than struck. The dominant billiard game in Britain from about 1770 until the early twentieth century was English Billiards, played with three balls and six pockets on a large rectangular table. A similar drawing of a game of billiards, but in reverse, is in the collection of the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven (TMS 5665).


     

  • Black Tor near Camelford, Cornwall -
    Sold

    signed lower right: Rowlandson 1801 and inscribed with title lower left
    watercolour over pencil with original washline mount
    15 by 24cm., 6 by 9 inches

    This is rare in Rowlandson's oeuvre in being a pure landscape with no figures. Iolo Williams mentions that `Rowlandson's contribution as a watercolour landscape artist.... must not be forgotten either, for it is often of great beauty' (Iolo Williams, Early English Watercolours, 1970, p.141) and he could have been talking about the present watercolour when he writes: `Here too are unexpected things, such as slight impressions, consisting of loose pale washes of colour over a few very free traces of pencil' (op. cit.).

    Rowlandson was a regular visitor to Cornwall to see his friend and patron the banker Matthew Michell from the 1790s until Michell?s death in 1819.Rowlandson frequently visited him at his estate at Hengar and also at his London address, Grove House near Enfield. Michell owned over 550 watercolours by Rowlandson at the time of his death. Michell?s country house, Hengar House, was six miles north of Bodmin and Rowlandson enjoyed sketching in the surrounding countryside ? the River Camel passed through his grounds.

  • `The Broken Mug or Babboon broke loose' -
    Sold

    inscribed with the title lower centre
    pen and brown ink and watercolour
    27.3 by 20.8cm., 10 3/4 by 8 inches

    Another version of this watercolour, without the inscription, was sold at Christie's on 9th July 1985, lot 59
  • Market Day, Norwich -
    Sold

    pen and brown ink and watercolour
    28.5 by 43.3cm., 11 1/4 by 17 inches

    This shows the Market Square, Norwich and the Church of St Peter Mancroft, the largest church in Norwich, built between 1430 and 1455. Another version of this watercolour with different figures is in the Norwich Castle Museum

    Provenance:
    Major Leonard Dent;
    Dent Sale of Rowlandsons, Christie's, 10th July 1984, lot 6;
    By descent to the present owner
  • The Croydon Coach -
    Sold

    pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour
    15.2 by 25.2cm., 6 by 9 3/4 inches
  • The Boating Parties -
    Sold

    pen and brown and grey ink over pencil on laid paper

    11.9 x 29.7 cm., 4 ? x 11 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Spink, London

    Bought by Sir David Scott (1887-1986), 24th September 1974

    By family descent until 2008

     

    This is similar to a number of drawings by Rowlandson of spectators at the annual race for Doggett?s Coat and Badge. This race is for apprentice boatmen and goes from London Bridge to Cadogan Pier, Chelsea. It was first run in 1715 and continues to this day. A similar drawing in grey and brown wash and the same size was sold at Christie?s on 14th July 1987, lot 160

  • Perry's Dock, Blackwall Reach, East London -
    Sold

    Pen and brown and grey ink over pencil

    29 x 43.2cm., 11 ? x 17inches

     

    Provenance:

    Bruce Ingram, his sale, Sotheby?s, 21st October 1964, lot 133, bt. Fine Art Society for ?320

    With Martyn Gregory Gallery

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby?s, 22nd March 2000, lot 144

     

    Literature:

    Apollo Magazine, April 1965, ill.

     

    Blackwall is a district of Poplar near the Isle of Dogs and the mouth of the Lea river. The Blackwall shipyard, opened in the late sixteenth century continued to repair and build ships, particularly for the East India Company, into the eighteenth century but did not finally close until 1980. A version of this watercolour inscribed `Perrys Dock Black Wall? was illustrated in The Connoisseur, December 1946.

  • The Riding School -
    Sold

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over pencil on wove paper watermarked [17]96

    137 x 208 mm., 5 ¼ x 8 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Salthrop Collection;

    Sir John Clermont Witt (1907-1982);

    By descent until 2017
  • Madame Cigali the Famous Female Fencer from Rome at Henry Angelo's Fencing Academy -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    14.4 by 23.8 cm., 5 ¾ by 9 ½ in.

     

    Rowlandson was evidently intrigued by the idea of a man and woman fencing as he drew at least five such studies. One in the Dent collection depicted Henry Angelo and `Madame Cain'. `Madame Culloni and Mons. Renault' in Paris is recorded in the Dent Collection with another version in the Yale Center for British Art. Another, of `Madame Kelu famous Fencer Native of Italy 1816' was sold at Sotheby's on 22nd March 1979, lot 57.

     

    Henry Charles William Angelo (1756-1835) was a close friend of Rowlandson for over fifty years and the artist depicted his Fencing Academy on a number of occasions. Angelo inherited the Academy from his father, the famous Italian swordsman Domenico Angelo in 1785. They were located over the entrance to the pit door of the Opera House, Haymarket but  were destroyed by fire on 17th June 1789 when Angelo moved the Academy to no.13 Bond St. It became more akin to a gentleman's club and Charles James Fox, Sheridan and Byron were regular attendees.

  • The Pursuit -
    Sold

    Signed lower right and dated 1790

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour on laid paper

    32.4 by 46.5 cm., 13 by 18 1/2 in.


    Provenance:

    Sidney Lovell Phipson (1851-1929)


    Sixty-three drawings and watercolours by Rowlandson from the collection of Sidney Phipson were exhibited at the Anderson Galleries, New York in 1923. This watercolour was published as a pair to `The Attack’ which depicted a lady and gentleman in a coach being accosted by a highwayman (for a full description, see Joseph Grego, Rowlandson the Caricaturist, p.289). A copy of this engraving is in the Royal Collection (RCIN 810410).

     

    Highwaymen exerted a macabre fascination on the British public in the eighteenth century. They were viewed with a combination of excitement and dread and some became heroes. Rowlandson returned to the subject on a number of occasions with a version of the subject dating from circa 1790 shows the highwayman in the same poise, turning and firing at his pursuers as he jumps a gate. On the hill beyond is a shadowy gibbet, a reminder of the likely fate of a captured highwayman.

  • The Hunt -
    Sold

    Signed lower left: T. Rowlandson 1812

    Pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil

    30.3 by 48.1 cm., 11 ¾ by 19 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Nubar Gulbenkian (1896-1972);

    With Spink, London, 1968;

    Private Collection until 2018

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Spink, Thomas Rowlandson 1756-1827, 7th to 23rd March 1978, no.10
  • The Horse-traders -
    Sold

    pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over pencil

    28 by 43cm., 11 by 16 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    The Arts Club, Dover St,. London

  • Weighing In at the Races -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and brown ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    17.6 by 27.2 cm., 6 ? by 10 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Probably Joseph Grego, 1889;

    Miss E.H. Newman, her sale, Sotheby?s, 24th November 1977, lot 201;

    With Spinks, London, 1978;

    With Agnew?s, London;

    Private Collection, UK until 2011

     

    Literature:

    John Hayes, The Art of Thomas Rowlandson, exhibition catalogue, 1990, no.60

     

    Exhibited:

    Probably London, Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, Works of the English Humourists in Art, June 1889, no. 203;

    London, Spink?s, Thomas Rowlandson, 7-23 March 1978, no. 12;

    London, Royal Academy, Derby Day 200, 1979, no. 9.1;

    New York, Frick Collection, The Art of Thomas Rowlandson, Feb. ? Apr. 1990, no.60;

    Pittsburgh, Frick Art Museum, The Art of Thomas Rowlandson, Apr. ? June 1990, no.60;

    Baltimore Museum of Art, The Art of Thomas Rowlandson, June ? Aug. 1990, no.60

     

    This drawing shows a jockey being weighed in before a race while his mount is being scraped prior to the race. At race meetings in the eighteenth century, horse and jockey assembled at the rubbing-down house before a race where the sweat on the horse was scrapped off. A finished version of this watercolour is recorded in the Halifax collection.

  • Gone to the Continent -
    Sold

    Signed lower right: Rowlandson. 18.., inscribed lower left: Gone out of Town for the Summer and inscribed with the title lower centre

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    27.9 by 22.4 cm., 11  by 8 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby?s 19th July 1979, lot 92;

    Private collection until 2011

     

    The name on the doorplate reads `Sir Gregory Page-Turner?. Sir Gregory Page-Turner, 3rd Bt. (1748-1805) was a wealthy politician and landowner who was MP for Thirsk.

  • View of Clovelly, North Devon, from the Pier -
    Sold

    Signed lower right: Rowlandson/1792 and inscribed under mount: north coast of Cornwall 
    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil 
    39.2 by 55.3 cm., 15 ¼ by 21 ¾ in. 

    Provenance: With the Fine Art Society, London, 1943; The Rev. Canon F. Shirley, his sale, Sotheby’s, 24th February 1960, lot 21; Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 16th November 2006, lot 50; Private Collection until 2019 

    Clovelly is a famously picturesque village on the north Devon coast. Situated on a steep hill, it has been privately owned by the Hamlyn family since 1738. A fishing village has been there since the 13th century and it is well known for its curved stone pier. Rowlandson was a regular visitor to Cornwall and Devon to see his friend and patron the banker Matthew Michell from the 1790s until Michell’s death in 1819. Rowlandson frequently visited him at his estate at Hengar and also at his London address, Grove House near Enfield. Michell owned over 550 watercolours by Rowlandson at the time of his death. His country house, Hengar House, was six miles north of Bodmin and Rowlandson enjoyed sketching in the surrounding countryside.
  • Horse Racing on Epsom Downs -
    Sold

    pen and grey ink and watercolour on laid paper
    16 by 22.5cm., 6 1/4 by 8 3/4 inches

    Racing on Epsom Downs was first recorded in 1661 and the Derby first run there in 1780.
  • Hazard Players -
    Sold

    inscribed lower left: Rowlandson and on old mount: Hazard Players
    pen and brown ink and wash
    7.7 by 16.2cm., 3 by 6 3/4 inches

    Provenance:
    Henry Reitlinger
  • Gentlemen in conversation, Venice -
    Sold

    pen and brown and grey ink and watercolour over pencil
    13.7 by 21.3cm., 5 1/4 by 8 1/4 inches.
  • The Passing Fancy -
    Sold

    pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    12 by 13.8cm., 4? by 5? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With J. & W. Vokins, King St., London

  • A Bridge over a River, Cornwall -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    14.3 x 29.6 cm., 5 ? x 11 ? inches

     

    Rowlandson regularly visited Cornwall to see his friend and patron the banker Matthew Michell from the 1790s until Michell?s death in 1819. Michell owned over 550 watercolours by Rowlandson and his country house, Hengar House, was six miles north of Bodmin. Rowlandson enjoyed sketching in the surrounding countryside and also visited Michell at his home, Grove House near Enfield.

  • The Father's Displeasure -
    Sold

    Bears signature lower left

    Pen and black ink and watercolour over traces of pencil on laid paper 21.7 by 24.2 cm., 8 ¼ by 9½ in.   

    Provenance:

    With Arthur Ackerman and Sons, London; 

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s New York, 17th June 1999, lot 42;

    With Spink-Leger, London, to 2000;

    Private collection, UK
  • The Ambush -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    140 x 222 mm., 5 ¾ x 8 ¾ in.

  • Returned from the Hunt -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper, with cut corners

    17.3 by 22.5 cm., 6 ¾ by 8 ¾ in.

     

    Provenance:

    with Leger Galleries, London, February 1981, where bought by the present owner

  • A Man-of-War off Portsmouth Point -
    Sold

    pen and brown ink and watercolour

    29.6 by 46.2cm, 11 1/2 by 18 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Desmond Coke;

    With the Fine Art Society, London, June 1945;

    Sir William Worsley, Hovingham Hall, 1945

     

    Exhibited:

    Scarborough, Scarborough Art Gallery, English Watercolours from Yorkshire Houses, June - July 1950

  • The Mid-day Rest -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour 

    With a signed pen and grey ink and pencil drawing verso

    15.1 by 22.2 cm., 5 ¾ by 8 ¾ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 20th July 1978, lot 196;

    Colin Hunter (1926-2013)

     

    A similar drawing `Labourers at Rest’ is in the Yale Center for British Art (see John Baskett and Dudley Snelgrove, The Drawings of Thomas Rowlandson in the Paul Mellon Collection, 1977, no. 82, ill.) and another, `Haymakers at Rest’ is in the Royal Library at Windsor (see A.P. Oppé, English Drawings at Windsor Castle, 1950, no. 525, pl. 84).

  • The Burial -
    Sold

  • The Messenger -
    Sold

    Signed lower right: T. Rowlandson 1789

    With `Scipio' collector's mark verso

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil on laid paper

    19.6 by 24.6 cm., 7 ¾ by 9 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Henry Scipio Reitlinger (1882-1950);

    With Leger Galleries, London, June 1969

  • Chamber Council -
    Sold

    Inscribed lower centre: CHAMBER COUNCIL, inscribed with collector's mark lower right and signed and inscribed by William Esdaile verso: 1828 WE Rowlandson’s sale N.44 Rowlandson

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    15.2 by 19.4 cm., 6 by 7 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    `A Catalogue of the valuable collection of prints, drawings & pictures of the late distinguished artist Thomas Rowlandson’, Sotheby’s 23rd June 1828;

    William Esdaile (1758-1837) (Lugt. no. 15877), his Executor’s sale, Christie’s, 25th June 1840, probably part of lot 1340 or 1341;

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 10th July 1984, lot 185 

  • The Afternoon Visit -
    Sold

    Pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil, with collector’s mark on border under mount

    14.8 by 24.2 cm., 5 ¾  by 9 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Gilbert Davis (1899-1983) (Lugt. No. 797a);

    With John Baskett Ltd, 172 New Bond Street, London, where bought by Bill and Joan Beale;

    By descent until 2018

     

    Exhibited:

    On Loan to the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 1997 to 2018

  • The Market Cross, Malmesbury, Wiltshire -
    Sold

    Inscribed lower left: MALMESBURY CROSS, WILTSHIRE

    Pen and brown and grey ink and watercolour

    14.8 by 23.4 cm., 5 ¾ by 9 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    With Messrs T and R Annan & Son, Glasgow, 1924;

    Anonymous sale, Morrison McChleary & Co,, Glasgow, 8th December 1977, lot 177;

    With R. & J. Jones, Kensington Church St, London, where bought June 1978;

    By descent to the present owner

     

     The Market Cross which dates from circa 1490, stands in the centre of Malmesbury at the corner of Market Cross and Gloucester Street adjacent to the Abbey.

  • Outside the Oyster Rooms -
    Sold

    Inscribed on shop front: OYSTER ROOMS/LOBSTERS PICKLED SALMON

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    13.3 by 9.6 cm., 5 ¼ by 3 ¾ in.

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnew & Sons, London (no.28716);

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby's, 10th July 1986, lot 72

  • The Statute Fair, St James's Square, Newport, Isle of Wight -
    Sold

    Inscribed lower left: Newport Statute Fair

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour and pencil

    12.9 by 25.3 cm., 5 by 10 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Desmond Coke (1879-1931);

    Anonymous sale, Christie's South Kensington, 3rd October 2001, lot 390;

    With Agnew's, 2002

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Agnew's, 129th Annual Exhibition of Watercolours and Drawings, 13th February to 8th March 2002, no.12

     

    This dates from Rowlandson's tour of the Isle of Wight with the businessman and amateur artist Henry Wigstead and Samuel Howitt in 1791. They travelled via Winchester to Lymington where they took the ferry to Yarmouth. They spent several months on the island exploring it thoroughly. For more on the tour, see Matthew and James Payne, Regarding Thomas Rowlandson – His Life, Art and Acquaintance, 2010, pp. 135-139. 

     

    Statute Fairs, or Hiring Fairs, were an annual fixture in most important country towns until the early twentieth century. They were originally held on Martinmas Day, 11th November and men and women lined up in the hope of being employed. A view of the same subject, incorrectly described 
  • Outside a West Country Coaching Inn -
    Sold

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    13.7 by 23.6 cm., 5 ? by 9 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Spinks, London, circa 1990

    Private collection, UK until 2011

  • Changing Horses at the Swan Inn, Brixton -
    Sold

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    13.9 by 23.4 cm., 5 ? by 9 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Spinks, London, circa 1990

    Private Collection, UK, until 2011

  • Horseracing on the Knavesmire, York -
    Sold

    Inscribed in another hand lower left: Nottingham

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    118 x 177 mm., 4 ½ x 7 in.

     

    Provenance:

    With Spink, London (K3 9390)

     

    Racing is recorded at York from Roman times but was well established at Clifton before moving to its current location on the Knavesmire in 1731. The first Grandstand, as depicted here, was built by the York architect John Carr in 1754 and race days regularly attracted crowds of over 100,000.

     

    There are other views of the Knavesmire by Rowlandson taken from the centre of the course showing the new grandstand with windmills on the hill behind it. Two drawings are in the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, with a more finished watercolour in York Art Gallery. It is also depicted in an 1813 engraving after Rowlandson entitled `Dr Syntax loses his Money on the Race Ground at York.'

  • Soldiers and a Cart on a Road -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil

    14.7 by 21.8 cm., 5 ? by 8 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Van Millingen family, Melville Hall, late nineteenth century

    By descent until 2012

  • A Cavalry Review -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil

    16.5 by 22.3 cm., 6 ½ by 8 ¾ in.

  • Study on the Banks of a River -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    21.4 by 27.9 cm., 8 ?  by 11 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Lord Farnham

    Dyson Perrin

    Mr and Mrs William Spooner, Ashbrook, Ilkley, Yorkshire

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby?s, 20th November 1986, lot 50

     

    This may be a view on the River Camel in Cornwall where Rowlandson often sketched when staying with his patron Matthew Michell in Cornwall.

  • The Courting Couple -
    Sold

    pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour

    14.5 by 23.3cm., 5 3/4 by 9 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Wilmington Museum, Delaware, U.S.A.;

    Richard Ivor;

    Private Collection, Yorkshire until 2008

  • The Pursuit of a Highwayman -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil on laid paper

    43.9 by 71.8 cm., 17 ? by 28 ? inches

     

    This important and unusually large, recently rediscovered drawing by Rowlandson dates to circa 1776-78 when he was in his early twenties. His early work shows the influence of John Hamilton Mortimer (1741-1779) in his use of pen and ink hatching but by the later 1770s Rowlandson is developing his own style and, as in the present work, increasingly uses watercolour as well as pen and ink.

     

    Highwaymen exerted a macabre fascination on the British public in the eighteenth century. They were viewed with a combination of excitement and dread and some became heroes. Rowlandson returned to the subject on a number of occasions with a version of the subject dating from circa 1790 shows the highwayman in the same poise, turning and firing at his pursuers as he jumps a gate. On the hill beyond is a shadowy gibbet, a reminder of the likely fate of a captured highwayman.

     

    A drawing ?A Highwayman accosting a Nobleman in his Carriage? sold at Sotheby?s on 14th July 1994, lot 19 is dated to the late 1770s by the late John Hayes and relates closely to the present work. Another comparable drawing ?The Hanging of Dr Dodd? in the Houghton Library, Harvard University dates from the same period (see John Hayes, The Art of Thomas Rowlandson, exhibition catalogue, 1990, no.4).

     

    We are grateful to Hugh Belsey for his help in dating the present drawing.

  • The Sculptor -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil

    16.9 by 13.2 cm., 6 ? by 5 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Van Millingen family, Melville Hall, late nineteenth century

    By descent until 2012

  • The Wurttemberg Artillery -
    Sold

    Inscribed lower left: Wurtemberg Artillery, with collector?s mark verso

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    20.2 by 27.3 cm., 8 by 10 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Gilbert Davis (b.1899) (Lugt. No. 757a);

    L.G. Duke;

    Ruskin Gallery, Stratford-on-Avon

     

    Gilbert Davis had a large collection of over three thousand British watercolours which included over 350 drawings by Rowlandson. The Arts Council arranged two exhibitions of his collection, in 1949 and 1955

  • Nymphs and Satyrs cavorting -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    34.1 by 45.9 cm., 13 ? by 18 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Dr John Percy (1817-1889) (Lugt 1504), collector?s mark verso, bought from Parker of Spur St, 1875

    Charles Seale Hayne (1833-1903), his sale 18th April 1904

    Louis Deglatigny (1854-1936) (Lugt 1768a), collector?s mark lower left, his sale, Sotheby?s 11th May 1938, lot 170

    Anonymous sale, Christie?s, 22nd November 1963, lot 6

  • The Hotel d?Hambourg, Paris -
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    Inscribed by the artist lower right: Hotel D?Hambourgh a Paris

    Pen and grey and brown ink and wash on laid paper with the artist?s original mount

    18.8 by 29.5 cm., 7 ?  by 11 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With W/S Fine Art, 2005;

    Private collection, UK until 2011

     

    Stylistically this dates from the mid 1780s which suggests it may have been drawn on Rowlandson?s third visit to Paris in 1785. A hotel of this name was in the St Germain area of Paris at the time and Benjamin is known to have stayed there in the winter of 1776-77. A similar drawing, once in the Witt collection, shows a scene outside the `Hotel de Montmorenci, Paris.?

  • The Fitzwilliam Hounds at Malton, Yorkshire -
    Sold

    signed lower right: Rowlandson 1803

    pen and brown and grey ink and watercolour on original washline mount

    24.4 by 36.8cm, 9 1/2 by 14 1/2 inches

     

    The house visible to the left in the present watercolour is Malton Lodge built in 1604 as the gatehouse to a large Jacobean mansion built on the site of the old Malton Castle. The mansion was pulled down in 1674 as the result of a squabble over ownership between two sisters Margaret and Mary Eure ? the local Sheriff threatened to demolish the property and give them each a pile of stones unless they came to an agreement. They failed to do so until after the main house was knocked down but before the lodge was destroyed so that the lodge and the original wall to the street are all that remain. The lodge is now The Old Lodge Hotel. To the right is the parish church of St Leonard?s. Pevsner describes it as follows:

     

     ?...... (the) wall to the street has three arch-ways, though the right one has lost its arch. The middle one has coupled pilasters, but is much decayed. The lodge is a substantial embattled block of five bays and two storeys. The centre bay is wider than the others and flanked by coupled Tuscan columns on the ground and first floor.? Sir Thomas Wentworth bought the manors of Old and New Malton in 1712 and in 1728 his successor, the Hon. Thomas Wentworth, was made a peer as Lord Malton. Six years later he was created Marquis of Rockingham. His son died without issue in 1782 and the manor of Malton with its other estates passed to his nephew, Earl Fitzwilliam and the estates remain in the same family today

     

    Provenance:

    Miss Fitzwilliam of Slingsby, Yorkshire;

    Sir William Worsley 4th Bart., (1890-1973), Hovingham Hall

     

    Exhibited:

    Scarborough, Scarborough Art Gallery, English Watercolours from Yorkshire Houses, June ? July 1950, no.18

  • The Gaming Party -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour

    11 by 18.9 cm., 4 ? by 7 ? inches

  • The Boating Party -
    Sold

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil

    24.5 by 35.5 cm., 9 1/2 by 14 in.

  • Crossing the Ford, Okehampton, Devon -
    Sold

    Signed lower right: Rowlandson. 1791 and inscribed lower left: Oakhampton

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    22 by 33 cm., 8 3/4 by 13 inches

     

    Okehampton stands at the junction of East and West Okement rivers in mid Devon just to the north of Dartmoor. A smaller view of Okehampton by Rowlandson dated 1816 was sold at Christie’s on July 10 1984, lot 31.

  • A Recruiting Party outside the Sun Inn, Bodmin, Cornwall -
    Sold

     Pen and grey and black ink and watercolour over pencil

    With a signed pen and grey ink and pencil drawing verso

    31.0 by 47.5 cm., 12 ¼  by 18 ¾ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 14th July 1994, lot 117;

    Private collection until 2012

  • The Landing Place by the Salutation Inn, Greenwich -
    Sold

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over traces of pencil

    34.4 by 54 cm., 13 1/2 by 21 1/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Frank T. Sabin, London, 1939;

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 12th July 1940, lot 183;

    Sir William Walton (1902-1983)

     

    Exhibited:

    Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Intern. Tentoonstelling ban Oude Kunst, July-October 1936, no.207;

    Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Exhibition of English Manners and Humour 1750-1850, February 1938, no. 73;

    London, Frank T. Sabin, Drawings by Thomas Rowlandson, 1939, no. 74

     

    This shows the Greenwich stairs next to the Salutation Inn with the Royal Hospital for Seamen (now the Royal Naval College) beyond. Rowlandson’s friend Henry Angelo later recalled that Rowlandson `was frequently making his sketches at Greenwich, his favourite resort, both for shipping and scenes relative to the assemblage of sailors…’ (see Angelo’s Pic Nic’; or, Table Talk, 1834, pp. 144-5).

     

    A slightly smaller version of this view is the Mellon Collection in the Yale Center for British Art (see John Riely, Rowlandson Drawings from the Paul Mellon Collection, exhibition catalogue, 1978, no. 72, ill. Pl. XXVIII) and another was sold from the Ingram collection at Sotheby’s on 8th December 2005, lot 171 for £15,000.

     

    This drawing belonged to the composer Sir William Walton whose 1925 overture `Portsmouth Point’ was inspired by a Rowlandson print of the same name. It depicts in musical form the life of British sailors in the eighteenth century.

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