• On the Thames at Staines -
    Price on request

    Inscribed lower left: Staines -/1842

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour on buff paper

    26.2 by 36.9 cm., 10 ? by 14 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnew & Sons, Manchester, 1891

     

    This is a view along the towpath at Staines from the Middlesex side of the river. Staines Bridge can be seen in the distance. The bridge with three arches in white granite was designed by George Rennie. Construction started in 1827, and it was opened in 1832.  The white stone pinnacles of St. Mary?s Church are also visible to the right of the bridge. A stone tablet on the church tower?s south face ascribes the design of the tower to Inigo Jones in 1631. However, after the Second World War, these stone pinnacles were removed as unsafe, possibly due to a bomb falling in the Wraysbury Road during the war.

     

    The present view of this stretch of river would now take in the Staines railway bridge which was built in 1856 almost directly where Richardson would have been sitting.

  • A rocky Shoreline with a rough Sea -
    Price on request

    Inscribed in pencil verso:  Richardson Jun.

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with white on grey paper

    19.2 by 27 cm., 7 ? by 10 ? inches

     

    This early work by Richardson Junior dates from the 1830s or 1840s.

  • A distant View of Lumley Castle, Durham -
    Price on request

    Signed lower left: TMR Junr/1841

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour, scratching out and gum arabic

    205 x 350 mm., 8 x 14 in.

     

    Lumley Castle is a 14th century castle at Chester-le-Street near Durham. It is named after its original creator, Sir Ralph Lumley who converted his family manor house into a castle in the late 14th century. In the 19th century it was the residence of the Bishop of Durham before being given to the newly founded University of Durham. It was part of University College, Durham until it was sold in the 1960s and is now a hotel.

  • The village and bridge of Dunkeld on the Tay, Perthshire -
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    watercolour and pencil

    36.2 by 53.3cm., 14 1/4 by 21 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Eldon Collection

     

    Dunkeld stands fifteen miles north of Perth on the River Tay. The bridge at Dunkeld was designed and built by Thomas Telford and opened in 1809.

  • View of Dunkeld on the Tay, Perthshire -
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    inscribed lower right: Dunkeld from the ....

    watercolour over pencil heightened with white on buff paper

    36 by 54cm., 14 by 21 1/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Eldon Collection

  • On the Thames at Twickenham -
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    Inscribed lower left: Twickenham -/1842

    Pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour on buff paper

    24.4 by 37.1 cm., 9? by 14 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnew & Sons, Manchester, 1891

     

    This is a view of Twickenham taken from Twickenham Eyot, or Eel Pie Island as it is now called. The Church of St Mary the Virgin can be seen on the left, with its 15th century ragstone tower joined to the more recent red brick Queen Anne nave and chancel completed in 1714, after the original church collapsed in 1713. On the right of St Mary?s Church stands York House. Its central portion dates from 1635 and it is probably the oldest surviving building in the area. Owners have included the first Earl of Clarendon, Prince Starhemberg and, in 1864 the Comte de Paris. The last private owner was Sir Ratan Tata, a Parsee merchant prince from Bombay. After the death of his widow the house was purchased by the Twickenham Borough Council and the first Council meeting was held there in 1926.

  • On the River Tummel, Perthshire -
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    Signed lower right: TMRichardson Junr/1849.

    watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour on buff paper

    31.8 by 49.3 cm., 12 1/2 by 19 1/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnew & Sons, London

     

    The river Tummel issues from the east end of Loch Rannoch and flows 29 miles east where it joins the Tay near Ballinluig. Loch Tummel is formed by an expansion of the river seven miles north-west of Pitlochry. This view may be taken at the eastern end of the loch, but a dam was built on the river in the 1950s which raised the water level and altered the landscape considerably. 

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