• The Manor House at Foxley, Wiltshire -
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    Inscribed with title on reverse of original mount

    grey washes over pencil

    15.1 by 21.5cm., 6 by 8 1/2 inches

     

    Foxley is a hamlet of stone cottages on the edge of Malmesbury Common. Foxley Manor is a five bay 18th century house with 17th century dovecote, derelict as of 1974. Henry Fox (1705-1774), the statesman, was raised to the House of Lords in 1763 as Baron Holland of Foxley.

  • The Gateway at Erwarton Hall, Suffolk -
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    Inscribed verso: Arewarden Suffolk/July 1799

    Grey washes over pencil

    154 x 239 mm., 6 x 9 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    With Spinks ….. K3 7554

    Private Collection until 2014

     

    Erwarton Hall is on the Shotley peninsula, nine miles south of Ipswich. The Hall was rebuilt in 1575 and the tunnel vaulted gateway, which still exists today, from 1549. Before the rebuilding, the house belonged to Anne Boleyn’s uncle and she is supposed to have been a regular visitor.

  • The Gateway, Allington Castle near Maidstone, Kent -
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    Grey washes over pencil on laid paper

    185 x 255 mm., 7 ½ x 10 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    With the Squire Gallery, London, where bought by Miss Sprent of Hove, Brighton, November 1955

     

    A view of the outer gateway of Allington Castle by Hearne is in the Victoria and Albert Museum (see David Morris, Thomas Hearne and his Landscape, 1989, p.31, no.18, ill.). An engraving of this view was published on 15th August 1783 as part of the `Antiquities of Great Britain' series. David Morris (op.cit., p.51) tells us that Hearne visited Allington Castle, the home of Lord Romney, in 1777.

     

    Allington castle was built by Stephen de Pencester between 1279 and 1299. It passed by marriage into the  Cobham family before being acquired by Sir Henry Wyatt, a supporter of Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) in 1492. From circa 1600 the castle gradually fell into ruin until it was rebuilt in the early twentieth century. 

  • Durham Castle and Framwell Gate Bridge from the Banks of the river Wear -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    20.4 by 25.9 cm., 8 by 10 in.

     

    Durham Castle was built by William of Conqueror with building work starting in 1072. It was later the home of the Prince-Bishops of Durham. Framwell Gate Bridge is a two arch pedestrian bridge over the Wear built in the fifteenth century.  

     

    Views of Durham by Hearne are in the British Museum, Ashmolean Museum, V. & A. Museum, Norwich Castle Museum and Leeds City Art Gallery (for three of them, see David Morris, Thomas Hearne and his Landscape, 1989, pls. 61-63, pp. 80-81). A grey wash version of this view by Hearne was with Guy Peppiatt Fine Art in 2014 (see One Hundred Drawings and Watercolours, winter catalogue 2014-15, no. 25a).


     

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