• Study of a Jewish Family, Jerusalem -
    Price on request

    Inscribed lower left: no.57 and on part of old mount: A Jewish Family - Jerusalem/1841

    Black chalk on blue paper, with cut corners

    15.6 by 27.9 cm., 6 by 11 in.

     

    Wilkie arrived in Jerusalem on 27th February in what he calls in his journal entry for that day `the most interesting city in the world.’ He had been travelling through Europe for six months and Jerusalem was one of his final stops. He remained there until 6th April when he headed south to Beirut and on to Alexandria. There he was taken ill and set off home via Malta dying on a ship off Gibraltar on 1st June.

     

    Wilkie was keen to see Jewish life in Jerusalem. His journals and letters recall several visits to Synagogues in Jerusalem. His Journal for 3rd March 1841 relates: `…went to Mount Zion; visited the Synagogue; much struck’ and for 17th March: `Went out early with Mr Woodburn and Reuben to the Synagogue; made drawing’ (see Allan Cunningham, The Life of Sir David Wilkie, 1843, vol. III, p.411). He made several oil sketches of Jewish life especially of religious observances. One of these drawings is especially rare and unusual for being taken inside a synagogue. An oil sketch `Jews Praying at the Wailing Wall’ is in the museum of the University of Dundee (see Nicholas Tromans, David Wilkie – Painter of Everyday Life, exhibition catalogue, 2002, no. 31, pp. 112-3, ill.).

  • A Jewish Synagogue, Jerusalem -
    Price on request

    Inscribed lower left: no.55 and on part of old mount: A Jewish Synagogue, Jerusalem/1841

    With a study of a church verso

    Black chalk on blue paper

    41.8 by 29.4 cm., 16 ¼ by 11 ½ in.

     

    Wilkie arrived in Jerusalem on 27th February in what he calls in his journal entry for that day `the most interesting city in the world.’ He had been travelling through Europe for six months and Jerusalem was one of his final stops. He remained there until 6th April when he headed south to Beirut and on to Alexandria. There he was taken ill and set off home via Malta dying on a ship off Gibraltar on 1st June.

     

    Wilkie was keen to see Jewish life in Jerusalem. His journals and letters recall several visits to Synagogues in Jerusalem. His Journal for 3rd March 1841 relates: `…went to Mount Zion; visited the Synagogue; much struck’ and for 17th March: `Went out early with Mr Woodburn and Reuben to the Synagogue; made drawing’ (see Allan Cunningham, The Life of Sir David Wilkie, 1843, vol. III, p.411). He made several oil sketches of Jewish life especially of religious observances. One of these drawings is especially rare and unusual for being taken inside a synagogue. An oil sketch `Jews Praying at the Wailing Wall’ is in the museum of the University of Dundee (see Nicholas Tromans, David Wilkie – Painter of Everyday Life, exhibition catalogue, 2002, no. 31, pp. 112-3, ill.).

  • Study of the Head of an Old Woman -
    Price on request

    Inscribed verso: Willy Shee Esq.r 8 November 1817

    Black and red chalk on buff paper

    285 x 213 mm., 11 ¼ x 8 ¼ in.

     

    This drawing is dated 8th November 1817 on the reverse. Wilkie had just returned from a four month visit to Scotland in early November and was beginning to work on `The Abbotsford Family' depicting Sir Walter Scott, whom he had visited, and his family. He was also reworking his 1814 painting `Duncan Gray' for exhibition and preparing studies for `The Penning Wedding' which had been commissioned by the Prince Regent and `The Chelsea Pensioners' which was commissioned by the Duke of Wellington in 1816 but not finished until 1822.

     

    It is reminiscent of an earlier head study of an old woman in black, red and white chalk on a similarly textured paper (see Nicholas Tromans, David Wilkie - Painter of Everyday Life, exhibition catalogue, 2002, no.34, p.122), which is a study for `The Cut Finger' exhibited in 1809. He tended to use coloured chalks for studies of the body (see Tromans, op.cit., nos. 36, 44, 50 and 57).

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