• Study of a Pheasant -
    Price on request

    Watercolour over pencil

    10.5 by 23.3 cm., 4 by 9 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Robert Witt

    Sir John and Lady Witt, their sale, Sotheby?s, 19th February 1987, lot 108

    Private Collection until 2011

  • The Cathedral of St Jacques, Dieppe -
    Price on request

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour

    29.7 by 45.8 cm., 11 ½ by 18 in.

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnews, London;

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby's, 21st July 1975, lot 186;

    By descent to the present owner

     

    This dates from de Wint’s only trip abroad, to Normandy in 1828. The church of St Jacques stands on the Place Saint-Jacques, one of the main squares in Normandy town. This view is of the north-east of the church looking south from the Place Saint-Jacques with the transept on the left. The church was built in around 1283 but the building was not finished until the late sixteenth century.

     

    Other Normandy views include `Dieppe Castle from the Beach’ in the Usher Art Gallery, Lincoln and views of Dieppe and Rouen were included in the sale of works by de Wint from the Mathew Pryor collection sold at Sotheby’s on 4th July 2002, lots 392-4).

     
  • Shipping off Neath, South Wales -
    Sold

    Watercolour over traces of pencil
    16 by 48.2cm., 6 by 19 inches
  • A Ploughman and Horsemen by a Castle -
    Sold

    Inscribed verso: Peter..../10
    pen and black ink
    10.2 by 12.7cm., 4 by 5 inches

    Hammond Smith (op. cit.) suggests that de Wint's pen and ink drawings were produced in the studio as `the pen is quite unsuited to field work.' He also points out that `many of them are executed on the backs of envelopes, letters, advertisements etc.' The inscription on the reverse of this drawing suggests it has been drawn on the back of an envelope

    Provenance:
    By descent from the artist;
    Tatlock family;
    Bostock family;
    With Spink and Son

    Literature:
    Hammond Smith, Peter de Wint, 1982, p.44, ill. fig.37

  • A Watermill in a Wooded River Landscape -
    Sold

    Watercolour

    18 by 21cm., 7 by 8 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    The Artist?s wife, Harriet de Wint

    By descent to Miss Tatlock, the artist?s grand-daughter

    Miss Muriel Grace Bostock

    Sir Geoffrey Harmsworth, Bt.

    Matthew Pryor, his sale, Sotheby?s, 4th July 2002, lot 388

    Private Collection

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Gerald Norman Gallery, Peter De Wint?s `Sketches from Nature? ? A Loan Exhibition of Watercolours and Drawings, no.95

  • Cookham on the Thames -
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    Watercolour over traces of pencil on two sheets of paper joined

    15.5 by 47.4cm., 6 by 18 ? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Harriet de Wint:

    By descent to Helen Tatlock;

    With Agnew?s, London, by 1924;

    William Craig Henderson (1873-1959);

    By descent to the present owner

     

    Literature:

    A.P. Opp?, The Watercolours of Turner, Cox and De Wint, 1925, no.134, pl. XXXIV

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Agnew?s, Exhibition of Water-Colour Drawings by Turner, Cox and De Wint, 1924, no.134;

    Lincoln, Usher Art Gallery, Peter de Wint, 1937, no.31

     

    The distinctive building in the distance may be Formosa Place, a gothic house built in 1785 by Sir George Young, Bart on the edge of the river on Formosa Island which is next to Cookham Lock. The house was demolished shortly after the Second World War.

     

    De Wint made thirteen drawings of the Thames for W.B. Cooke?s Thames Scenery between 1814 and 1829 and although this image was not used, it may relate to this series. Another view of Cookham by the artist is in the collection of the University of Liverpool (see David Scrace, Drawings and Watercolours by Peter de Wint, 1979, p.19, no.46).

  • The Church of St. Peter, Lisieux, Normandy -
    Sold

    Pencil

    15.5 x 12.9 cm., 6 x 5 inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Thos. Agnew and Sons, London

     

    This drawing dates from de Wint?s only trip abroad, to Normandy in 1828. This is the west front of the church. John Sell Cotman visited Lisieux in July 1818 and drew the church from a similar viewpoint. The drawing was engraved for Cotman?s Normandy published in 1822 so it may have been known by de Wint.

  • View of Nottingham from the Trent, with the Castle and St. Mary?s Church -
    Sold

    Grey wash and pencil

    5 by 18.1 cm., 2  by 7  inches

     

    Provenance:

    Removed from an album of de Wint sketches compiled in the 1870s by Sarah Brooks, whose granddaughter, Mrs Boover Brooks, was the artist?s aunt

    By descent to Mrs A.G. Dawes

    With Andrew Wyld 1979

    Private Collection until 2012

     

    Exhibited:

    Andrew Wyld, 3 Cork St.,  Exhibition of Works by Peter de Wint, September/October 1979,  no. 33

     

    This is drawn on the back of part of a letter to de Wint which accompanied payment for rent. It relates closely to the watercolour of Nottingham in the Victoria and Albert Museum which is dated to 1847/8.

  • Nottingham Castle from the West -
    Sold

    Pen and brown ink

    6.4 by 18.2 cm., 2 ? by 7 inches

     

    Provenance:

    By descent from the artist to Miss H.H. Tatlock

    Miss G.M. Bostock

    With Andrew Wyld 1979

     

    Exhibited:

    Andrew Wyld, 3 Cork St.,  Exhibition of Works by Peter de Wint, September/October 1979,  no. 36

     

    This is drawn on the back of part of a letter to de Wint which accompanied payment for rent.

  • Trees at the edge of a Cornfield, hills beyond -
    Sold

    With a watercolour of a river scene verso

    Watercolour 

    15.2 by 31.8 cm., 6 by 12 1/2 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Lord Clwyd;

    With the Manning Gallery, London, 1967, where bought by John Byng Kenrick for £315;

    By descent until sold at Christie’s, 5th June 2003, lot 100

     

    Exhibited:

    London, W/S Fine Art, Peter de Wint 1784-1849 – Colourist and Countryman, 16 November to 9 December 2005, no. 24

  • View of Derwentwater, Cumbria -
    Sold

    Watercolour over pencil

    29.9 by 46.2 cm., 11 3/4 by 18 inches

     

    This is a view looking south down Derwentwater from Castlerigg with Walla Crag to the left and Maiden Moor. De Wint was a frequent visitor to the Lake District in the 1830s and 1840s. He often stayed with the Howard family at Levens Hall and the Lonsdales at Lowther Castle.

  • A House at Tonbridge, Kent -
    Sold

  • Llandaff Cathedral, South Wales -
    Sold

    Numbered verso: 258 

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with scratching out and stopping out on wove paper watermarked: WHATMAN 1829

    32.4 by 49.6 cm., 12 ¾ by 19 ½ in.

     

     Provenance:

    John Vaughan, 1848;

    With Thos. Agnew, London, 1918, where bought by Walter A. Barret;

    With Thos. Agnew, London, 1990;

    With Andrew Wyld, London, 2005

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Society of Painters in Water-colours, 1848, no. 258;

    London, Agnew’s, Annual English Watercolour Exhibition, 1990, no. 60;

    London, Andrew Wyld, Peter de Wint 1784-1849, Colourist and Countryman, 2005, no. 28 

     

    Llandaff Cathedral stands on the banks of the river Taff, two miles north-west of the centre of Cardiff. De Wint first visited South Wales and was struck by the beauty of the landscape. He faithfully records the cathedral as it stood at the time but he drawn a tree to disguise the rather incongruous classical temple built by John Wood of Bath in the ruined nave in the 1740s. He has also added mountains behind for dramatic effect.

     

    By the time de Wint exhibited the present work in 1848, a rebuilding programme of the cathedral had started under T.H. Wyatt. By 1845, John Prichard had taken over the project and it lasted on and off until 1861 (see John Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, 1995, p.241). As part of the work, the temple was demolished and the cathedral rebuilt in a gothic style. This lasted until 1941 when it was badly damaged in the War and was rebuilt by George Pace between 1949 and 1957.

     

  • Cornfields near Tring Station, Hertfordshire -
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    Inscribed verso upper left: Tring 1847 and upper right: Tring Station 14th August/1847

    Watercolour over pencil on two sheets of wove paper joined, one watermarked: Creswick 1818

    22.9 by 66.5 cm., 9  by 26 in.

     

     Provenance:

    Helen Tatlock, the artist’s daughter;

    By descent to Harriet Helen Tatlock (d.1922));

    By whom given to Muriel Bostock (d. 1941);

    Bequeathed by her to her companion, in whose collection it remained until 2004;

    With Agnew’s;

    Private Collection until 2012

     

    Exhibited:

    London, J.W. Vokins, Peter de Wint Centenary Exhibition, 1884, no. 120;

    Lincoln, Usher Art Gallery, Peter de Wint, 1937, no.6;

    London, Agnew’s, 122nd Annual English Watercolour Exhibition, 1995, no. 31

     

    The excavation of the Tring Cutting in the 1830s enabled the London to Birmingham railway line to be laid. The cutting was two and half miles in length.

  • A View on the Trent near Nottingham -
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    Pen and brown ink and washes over pencil on wove paper watermarked 1843, drawn on the back of a letter to de Wint which accompanied payment for rent

    4.2 by 18.7 cm, 1 ¾  x 7 ½ inches

     

    Provenance

    By descent from the artist to Miss H.H. Tatlock

    Miss G.M. Bostock

    With Andrew Wyld 1979

    Private Collection until 2012

     

    Exhibited

    Andrew Wyld, 3 Cork St., Exhibition of Works by Peter de Wint, September/October 1979, no. 35

  • View of Nottingham from the Trent -
    Sold

    Grey washes and pencil, drawn on the back of part of a letter to de Wint which accompanied payment for rent

    5.1 by 18.1 cm., 2 ¼ by 7 ¼ inches

     

    Provenance

    Removed from an album of de Wint sketches compiled in the 1870s by Sarah Brooks, whose grandmother, Mrs Boover Brooks, was the artist's aunt

    By descent to Mrs A.G. Dawes

    With Andrew Wyld, 1979

    Private Collection until 2012

     

    Exhibited

    Andrew Wyld, 3 Cork St., Exhibition of Works by Peter de Wint, September/October 1979, no. 33

     

    This is a view from the east showing Nottingham Castle and St. Mary's Church. It relates closely to a view of Nottingham by de Wint in the Victoria and Albert Museum which is dated to 1847/8.

  • Warwick Castle from the River Avon -
    Sold

  • A Woman on a Donkey returning from Market -
    Sold

    Indistinctly inscribed verso

    Watercolour over traces of pencil

    30.5 by 25.6 cm., 10 ¼ by 12 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 10th October 1974, lot 78;

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby's, 30th June 2005, lot 262, sold for £7,200 (hammer)

  • A Farm Cottage, Methley, Yorkshire -
    Sold

    Brown washes over pencil

    25 by 38 cm., 9 ¾ by 15 in.

     

    Provenance:

    With the Manning Gallery, 1967;

    Matthew Pryor (1917-2005), his sale, Sotheby's, 4th July 2002, lot 324, bt. by the present owner

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Manning Gallery, Early English Watercolours, 20th February to 10th March 1967

     

    A larger, coloured version of this watercolour was sold at Christie's on 15th November 1983, lot 246. Methley is now part of the city of Leeds, south-east of the centre.

  • Leathley Church on the River Wharfe, Yorkshire -
    Sold

    Watercolour over pencil

    26.7 by 39.2 cm., 10 ½ by 15 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby's, 27th November 2003, lot 273, where bought by the present owner

     

    Leathley is a small village one mile north east of Otley in North Yorkshire near the border with West Yorkshire. This is a view taken from the north looking down the river Wharfe with the  Norman tower of Leathley church visible on the hill to the left.

    De Wint was a frequent visitor to his patron (and Turner’s) Walter Fawkes (1769-1825) of Farnley Hall, which was only a few miles from Leathley. A nineteenth century biography records a visit: `Bolton Abbey he visited many times….. He first saw it in 1814 when he went to Farnley Hall on a visit to Mr Fawkes’ (Sir Walter Fawkes, Memoir of Peter De Wint, 1888). Stylistically this dates from circa 1820.

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