• Fishing Boats at Low Tide, Dover -
    Price on request

    Grey washes over pencil

    28.6 by 20.7 cm., 11 1/4 by 8 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Arthur Crosland, Heaton Mount, Bradford, Yorkshire, his sale, Christie’s, 9th March 1956, lot 20;

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 11th July 1996, lot 21:

    Private Collection, UK, until 2013

  • A Boatbuilder's Yard, Dover -
    Price on request

    Joseph Mallord William Turner, R.A. (1775-1851) and Thomas Girtin (1775-1802)

    A Boatbuilder's Yard, Dover


    Grey washes and pencil

    21 by 29 cm., 8 ¼ by 11 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Christie's, 9th June 2005, lot 32;

    Private Collection

     

    This sketch, dating from 1795-96, belongs to a group of views of shipping at Dover copied by Turner and Thomas Girtin from the work of the amateur artist and collector John Henderson probably commissioned by Dr Monro. Henderson was a neighbour on Adelphi Terrace, London, of Dr Thomas Monro who commissioned work from both Turner and Girtin in the early to mid1790s. On a number of drawings, they worked together with Girtin drawing in pencil and Turner adding the washes.

     

     Joseph Farington records in his diary (1st December 1795) that Henderson lent Monro `a Portfolio of outlines of Shipping and boats, made at Dover.’ Henderson’s sketches were probably drawn in the summer of 1794. A number of these Dover subjects appeared at Dr Monro’s sale at Christie’s on 26th June 1833 and were bought by Turner. They are now in the Turner Bequest in the Tate Gallery and are similar views of Dover (D36616-36624). Others are in the Courtauld Institute, National Gallery of Scotland and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Henderson’s collection which includes several of his `outlines’ passed to his son who bequeathed it to the British Museum

     

    We are grateful to Andrew Wilton for confirming the attribution

  • Bergamo -
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    Inscribed on reverse of original mount watermarked 1795: Bergamo

    Watercolour over traces of pencil on Whatman paper  

    17 by 22.7 cm., 6 1/2 by 8 3/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Probably Dr Thomas Monro, his sale, Christie’s, 2nd July 1833, lot 131, bt. Moon Boys & Graves for 5 gns;

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 23rd April 1844, lot 78, bt. Murray;

    John Murray III (1808-1892);

    By descent to the present owner

     

    This is an example of Turner’s early work, dating from circa 1794-95 when he was working for Dr Thomas Monro (1759-1833) at his drawing academy at 8 Adelphi Terrace, London. Monro commissioned young artists to copy works from his collection and was one of the most important patrons of his day. His collection included many works by John Robert Cozens, who Monro treated during his mental illness in the 1790s, and he had access to his sketchbooks.

     

    Bought by John Murray III at Christie’s in 1844, it has remained in the present collection ever since. It was probably the drawing entitled `Bergamo’ in Dr Monro’s sale at Christie’s in 1833. The view is from the village of Gorle, an old medieval town on the outskirts of Bergamo.   Turner has included the edge of what was once a fortified tower, commonly known as a borghetto.  Situated on the west bank of the River Serio, the remains were destroyed in a fire.  Gorle had many fine buildings, including the summer home of the Bishops of Bergamo, however the villa pictured in the background here is no longer standing.  The mountains still dominate the view, including the unusually shaped pyramidal Monte Nese, in the low Alps bordering the town.

    Educated at Charterhouse, John Murray III joined the family publishing house, which had been founded by his grandfather, in 1828, based, as it still is, at 50 Albemarle St, Mayfair. In 1836, he launched a series of travel guides of European countries and in 1843 took over the running of the family firm on the death of his father. He ran the firm until his death in 1892 publishing many notable authors including David Livingstone and Charles Darwin.  Murray's relationship with Turner is documented by letters in the John Murray Archive now in the National Library of Scotland.

  • The Bridge of Narni, Italy -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    15 by 22.1cm., 6 by 8? inches.

     

    Provenance:

    Captain J. Pilkington, 1873;

    M.R.C. Lomax, his sale, Sotheby?s, 18th March 1982, lot 150;

    Private Collection, U.K. until 2009

     

    This is a particularly good example of Turner?s early work, dating from circa 1794-95 when he was working for Dr Thomas Monro (1759-1833) at his drawing academy at 8 Adelphi Terrace, London. Monro commissioned young artists to copy works from his collection and consequently became one of the most important patrons of his day. His collection included many works by John Robert Cozens, who Monro treated during his mental illness in the 1790s, Wilson, Gainsborough and Canaletto. It is likely to be based on a work by Cozens when he was in Italy.

     

    Narni is an ancient Umbrian hilltown in the province of Terni in a strategic position overlooking the River Nera. It is famous for its large Roman bridge of which only half survives. In the distance the new bridge across the Nera is visible.

     

    This watercolour is sold with a letter of authentication from John Ruskin.

  • Lago di Agnano seen from Astroni, Italy -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    17.7 by 23.2 cm., 7 by 9 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby?s, 18th July 1974, lot 132

     

    This is an example of Turner?s early work, dating from circa 1794-95 when he was working for Dr Thomas Monro (1759-1833) at his drawing academy at 8 Adelphi Terrace, London. Monro commissioned young artists to copy works from his collection and consequently became one of the most important patrons of his day.  His collection included many works by John Robert Cozens, who Monro treated during his mental illness in the 1790s, and he also had access to his sketchbooks.

     

    The present work is based on a drawing of this subject by Cozens in the Beckford Sketchbooks now in the Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester (D.1975.7.29). Cozens visited Italy for the second time in 1782 with the collector William Beckford and his sketch is inscribed with the subject and dated 11th November 1782. Interestingly Cozens?s drawing is executed in grey wash and pencil whereas Turner?s version is more finished, in full watercolour, with more detail particularly with the addition of the boat and figure in the foreground. Both drawings are on almost identically sized sheets.

     

    Agnano is a volcanic crater to the north-west of Naples. In 1782 the crater was filled with water to make the Lago di Agnano but it was drained in 1870. Turner visited the area himself in 1819 and drew various views of Agnano ? his sketchbook is preserved in the Turner Bequest in the Tate (Italian Guide Book Sketchbook, Finberg CLXXII).

  • The Church of San Giorgio on the river Adige, Verona -
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    Inscribed on part of former backboard: Verona/J.M.W. Turner

    Watercolour over pencil

    16.5 by 22.6 cm., 6? by 8? inches

     

    Provenance:

    Leicester Galleries, London;

    Private collection, UK;

    Anonymous sale, Christie?s, 9th July 1996, lot 39;

    Private collection, Suffolk

     

    This is a view taken from Castel San Pietro which stands on a hill above Verona looking down on the church of San Giorgio in Braida. The church is situated on a bend in the river Adige which continues westwards in the distance. Turner has exaggerated the size of the hill behind and its proximity to the church.

     

    This watercolour is an example of Turner?s early work, dating from circa 1794-95 when he was working for Dr Thomas Monro (1759-1833) at his drawing academy at 8 Adelphi Terrace, London. Monro commissioned young artists to copy works from his collection and consequently became one of the most important patrons of his day. His collection included many works by John Robert Cozens, who Monro treated during his mental illness in the 1790s, and he also had access to his sketchbooks.

     

    The present work is based on a drawing of this subject by Cozens.  Cozens visited Verona on his way to Venice in June 1782 during his trip to Italy in the company of William Beckford. A drawing ?From the top of the Arena at Verona? dated 10th June is in the Beckford sketchbooks now in the Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester.

  • The Coast under Vietri, Salerno beyond -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    15.6 by 22.9 cm., 6 by 9 inches

     

    Provenance:

    With Anthony Reed Gallery, London, circa 1980;

    Private Collection, London, until sold at Sotheby?s, 21st March 2002, lot 160, bt. by the present owner

     

    This is an example of Turner?s early work, dating from circa 1794-95 when he was working for Dr Thomas Monro (1759-1833) at his drawing academy at 8 Adelphi Terrace, London.  Monro was one of the most important patrons of his day and commissioned young artists, including Turner and Girtin, to copy works from his collection. He treated John Robert Cozens for mental illness during the early 1790s and consequently was allowed access to the artist's sketchbooks.

     

    The present work is based on a drawing of this subject by Cozens in the Beckford Sketchbooks now in the Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester (vol. III, no.12). Cozens visited Italy for the second time in 1782 with the collector William Beckford and his sketch of this subject is inscribed with the subject and dated 23rd September 1782.

  • A Limekiln at Briton Ferry, South Wales - Moonlight -
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    Signed lower right

    Watercolour over traces of pencil

    19.5 by 27.3 cm., 7 1/2 by 10 3/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 23rd April 1844, lot 81, bt. Murray;

    John Murray III (1808-1892);

    By descent to the present owner

     

    This recently rediscovered watercolour by Turner was bought at auction in 1844 and has been in the John Murray collection ever since. Turner visited the area on his tour of South Wales in the summer of 1795 and this studio work is likely to date from later the same year. It was drawn from what was once a small promontory on the western bank of the River Neath looking towards Briton Ferry with the moon rising above the slopes of the Briton Ferry Wood above the village, looking beyond towards the larger hill of Mynydd-y-Gaer in the distance. The area is now much changed with the M4 and A48 bridges now dominating the landscape. A pencil sketchbook of the limekiln is in Turner’s South Wales sketchbook in the Turner Bequest, Tate Gallery (TBXXVI, D00566) as well as other views of Briton Ferry and the area.

     

    Turner appears to be painting a corona or aureole around the Moon which is quite often seen when the Moon is hidden, partially or fully, by cloud. The water droplets in the clouds cause diffraction effects and sometimes coloured rings of light.

     

    We are grateful to Eric Shanes and Mike Frost of the British Astronomical Association for their comments on the watercolour.

     

    Educated at Charterhouse, John Murray III joined the family publishing house, which had been founded by his grandfather, in 1828, based, as it still is, at 50 Albemarle St, Mayfair. In 1836, he launched a series of travel guides of European countries and in 1843 took over the running of the family firm on the death of his father. He ran the firm until his death in 1892 publishing many notable authors including David Livingstone and Charles Darwin.  Murray's relationship with the artist is documented by letters in the John Murray Archive now in the National Library of Scotland.

  • The Westminster and Claudine ashore at Margate, Kent (recto);Study of the Westminster or the Claudine (verso) -
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    Pencil and white chalk on blue paper

    13.9 by 19.2 cm., 5 ½ by 7 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Sophia Booth (1798-1875), Margate;

    By descent to her son John Pound until 1865;

    Laurence W. Hodson, Compton Hall, near Wolverhampton by 1884;

    Thence by descent until 1978;

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 30th November 1978, lot 97, part of an album, bt. Feigen;

    Richard L. Feigen, New York until 2015

  • Kingsgate Castle, Broadstairs, Kent (recto); The Westminster and Claudine ashore at Margate, Kent (verso) -
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    Inscribed verso: Claudine and Westminster

    Pencil and white chalk on blue paper

    14.1 by 19.4 cm., 5 ½ by 7 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Sophia Booth (1798-1875), Margate;

    By descent to her son John Pound until 1865;

    Laurence W. Hodson, Compton Hall, near Wolverhampton by 1884;

    Thence by descent until 1978;

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 30th November 1978, lot 97, part of an album, bt. Feigen;

    Richard L. Feigen, New York until 2015

  • The Ahr Valley: Altenahr and Burg Are with the Schwarzes Kreuz, Germany -
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  • Wells Cathedral, Somerset -
    Sold

    Pencil

    22.1 by 25.9 cm., 8 ½ by 10 in..

     

    Provenance:

    With Colnaghi, where bought by Michael Ingram, 1951;

    Michael Ingram, his sale, Sotheby's, 8th December 2005, lot 149, where bought by the present owner


    This is a view of Wells Cathedral from the south across the moat of the Bishop’s Palace. The two towers in the centre are the remains of the hall of the Bishop’s Palace built in the late 13th century. This appears to be a missing sheet from Turner's `South Wales' sketchbook which he used in the summer of 1795. This was his third visit to Wales and his first comprehensive tour. He first used the sketchbook in Wells then continued to Bristol, Newport, Swansea, Neath and Cardiff. He went on to Pembrokeshire and returned via Brecon and Monmouth. There are two views of Wells still in the sketchbook, nos. TB XXIV 1 and 2.

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