• The Entrance to Yordas Cave, Yorkshire -
    Sold

    Signed lower left: John Piper/Entrance/to Yordas Cave

    Pen and ink and watercolour heightened with bodycolour

    40.6 by 53.3 cm., 16 by 21 inches

     

    This watercolour dates from the mid to late 1940s and show Piper at his most brooding and atmospheric. The dark colouring and fierce intensity are reminiscent of Samuel Palmer?s Shoreham period watercolours dating from 1825-30 and Piper was aware of the influence. In his British Romantic Artists, published in 1942, Piper extols the virtues of Palmer?s work: `Mysterious shadows shortening before the rising full moon, the cut edge of the standing corn, fruit trees lolling to the ground under their weight. These were the realities that gave substance to his visions? (p.32). David Fraser Jenkins notes the influence in Piper?s series of ruined cottages drawn between 1941 and 1943, `painted in the rich brunette of Palmer?s gummy watercolours? (David Fraser Jenkins, John Piper: The Forties, exhibition catalogue, 2000, p.42). This description could be applied to the present work.

     

    Yordas Cave, so named as it was reputedly the lair of the infant-devouring Norse giant Yordas, is in Yordas? Wood in Kingsdale near Ingleton in the Yorkshire Dales.

  • The Devil?s Bridge Waterfall, Aberystwyth, Wales -
    Sold

    Pen and black ink, watercolour heightened with pastel, bodycolour and gum arabic

    50.8 by 38.1 cm., 20 by 15 inches

     

    Provenance:

    The late Mrs E.E. Bruhl until 1995;

    Private collection until 2011

     

    This watercolour relates to the works Piper was producing for his series of lithographs published in 1944 as `English, Scottish and Welsh Landscape? and particularly the Welsh views from the series. Equally it could date from as late as 1949. For a comparable work of another Welsh subject, see `Ffynnon Llugwy?, John Piper, Tate Exhibition catalogue, 1983, no. 111.

     

    It shows Piper at his most brooding and atmospheric. The dark colouring and fierce intensity are reminiscent of Samuel Palmer?s Shoreham period watercolours dating from 1825-30 and Piper was aware of the influence. In his British Romantic Artists, published in 1942, Piper extols the virtues of Palmer?s work: `Mysterious shadows shortening before the rising full moon, the cut edge of the standing corn, fruit trees lolling to the ground under their weight. These were the realities that gave substance to his visions? (p.32). David Fraser Jenkins notes the influence in Piper?s series of ruined cottages drawn between 1941 and 1943, `painted in the rich brunette of Palmer?s gummy watercolours? (David Fraser Jenkins, John Piper: The Forties, exhibition catalogue, 2000, p.42). This description could be applied to the present work.

  • A Ruined Cottage -
    Sold

    Signed lower right and dated 1941

    Pen and black ink, watercolour and coloured chalks heightened with bodycolour and gum arabic

    35.5 by 46 cm., 14 by 18 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby?s, 3rd April 1963, lot 153, where bought by the father of the present owner

Thumbnail panels:
Now Loading