• A Feast of the Gods -
    Price on request

    Signed lower left: John C. Nixon fecit et Inven.t 1778 and inscribed with title on a cartouche on the border

    Watercolour over pencil heightened with bodycolour on laid paper

    Whole sheet 31.3 by 44.2 cm., 12 ½  by 17 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Anonymous sale, 12th July 1988, lot 58, bought by the present owner

     

  • At the Sun Inn, Foster Inn, Cheapside -
    Price on request

    Signed with initials lower left and dated 1795 and inscribed lower right: At the Sun Foster Lane/Cheapside

    Pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    15.3 by 12.1 cm., 6 by 4 ¾ in.

     

    Foster Lane runs southwards from Gresham Street to Cheapside north-east of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

  • At King’s Auction Room, King St, Covent Garden -
    Price on request

    Signed centre right: At Kings Auction Room/King S.t Covent Garden/J.N. ’97- and numbered 38 lower centre right

    Pen and grey ink and wash

    14.9 by 23.2 cm., 5 ¾ by 9 in.

     

    King’s auction house was at 38 King St, Covent Garden, London. An auction house was started on the site in 1760 by Samuel Paterson who is reputed to have read every book in the English language. He mainly sold books, prints and manuscript as did his successors at 38 King St, King, Collins and Chapman. In 1796, the year before the present drawing was executed, it became King & Son. John Crace Stevens bought into the business in the 1820s and in 1834 it became J.C. Stevens Auction Rooms. It remained on the site until closing in the 1940s.
  • The Royal Meeting at Ascot, 1791 -
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    inscribed upper left: Ascot Heath Races 28 June 1791
    pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil
    13.8 by 21.5cm., 5 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches

    This is a rare early view of horseracing at Ascot. Racing first took place at Ascot (then called `East Cote') on 11th August 1711 after Queen Anne came across an area of open heath that looked ideal for `horses to gallop at full stretch' while she was out riding near Windsor Castle.The first race was called Her Majesty's Plate over four miles and worth 100 guineas to the winner. The first four day meeting took place in 1768 but the first permanent stand was not erected until 1794, three years after the present watercolour was drawn. It was called the Royal Stand and held 1,650 people
  • The Friday Market and Theatre, Ann Street, Belfast -
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    Signed verso: a Friday market at Belfast/with a View of the Theatre/J Nixon/1809

    pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour

    29.9 by 45.1cm, 11 3/4 by 17 3/4 inches

     

    The Ann Street Theatre opened in 1778 and was occupied for its first few seasons by the actor Myron Hamilton and his company. On a 1791 map of Belfast, it is described as the ‘New Playhouse’. It was later demolished at an unknown date. Ann Street is one of the oldest streets in Belfast and runs parallel to High Street - in the eighteenth century it ran between Shambles Street (now William Street South) which is the road disappearing behind the theatre to the right and Queens Bridge. This view is taken from the Corn Market with Ann St to the left.

     

    Nixon was an amateur artist who was in business in London with his brother Richard as an Irish merchant. He travelled extensively on sketching tours including several trips to Ireland in the 1780s and 1790s often in the company of other artists such as Francis Grose or Thomas Rowlandson. This picture is a later work and clearly shows the influence of Rowlandson under whose tutelage he became ‘a very professional amateur indeed’ (Huon Mallalieu, Dictionary of British Watercolour Artists, 2002, vol. II, p.77). A view of Belfast after Nixon was engraved by George Walker and published in 1797. A view of the Linen Hall, Belfast by Nixon, dated 1790, was sold at Christie’s on 14th May 2004, lot 75.

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Royal Academy, 1809, no.462 as `A market day in Belfast’

  • The High St, Glastonbury -
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    Inscribed lower left: A Bath Parson/Mother Nash

    Pen and grey and brown ink and watercolour over pencil, squared

    30.3 by 46cm, 11 3/4 by 18 inches

     

    The George Inn, visible to the left, is the original pilgrim?s Inn of Glastonbury Abbey. Pevsner described it as ?one of the most sumptuous of the small number of surviving inns before the Reformation.? Beyond is the Parish church of St. John?s dating from the fifteenth century with its tall west tower.  This picture is a later work and clearly shows the influence of Rowlandson under whose tutelage he became ?a very professional amateur indeed? (Huon Mallalieu, Dictionary of British Watercolour Artists, 2002, vol. II, p.77).

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Royal Academy, 1812, no.546 as ?The High St at Glastonbury, with a view of the Abbot?s inn, the Conduit, etc.?

  • The Race Ground, Tremadoc Races -
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    inscribed with title lower left

    pen and grey and brown washes over pencil

    9.3 by 12.3cm., 3 1/2 by 4 3/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    The French Hospital of La Providence;

    With Spink & Son, London

     

    Tremadoc is an early nineteenth century planned village in North Wales, created by William Madocks M.P. The village was built on land recovered from marshes beside Traeth Mawr in 1800. It stands 4 1/2 miles north-east of Criccieth. Nixon exhibited `Tremadoc, with a view of Taw-yr-Alt, North Wales, the seat of W.A. Madocks MP?at the Royal Academy in 1808, no.334.

  • At Ascot Racecourse -
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    Signed lower left: JN: 1791./..cot Races 29 June and numbered 109 upper centre

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour on laid paper

    21 by 14.1 cm., 8 ¼ by 5 ½ in.

     

    This is a rare early view of horseracing at Ascot. Racing first took place at Ascot (then called `East Cote') on 11th August 1711 after Queen Anne came across an area of open heath that looked ideal for `horses to gallop at full stretch' while she was out riding near Windsor Castle. The first race was called Her Majesty's Plate over four miles and worth 100 guineas to the winner. The first four day meeting took place in 1768 but the first permanent stand was not erected until 1794, three years after the present watercolour was drawn. It was called the Royal Stand and held 1,650 people.

     

    Another view of Ascot racecourse, dated 28th June 1791 was with Guy Peppiatt Fine Art in 2006 (see Guy Peppiatt Fine Art, 18th and 19th Century Drawings and Watercolours, exhibition catalogue, 2006, no. 9).
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