• A study of Lord Chesterfield’s Hand -
    Price on request

    Signed with monogram and inscribed lower left: Ld Chsterfield’s hand – for the large picture

    Black and red chalk and stump on wove paper watermarked J Whatman/1811

    22.9 by 25.7 cm., 9 by 10 in.

     

    The present drawing is a study for the right hand of George Stanhope, 6th Earl of Chesterfield (1805–1866), for Ward’s large scale painting of Lord Stanhope, Riding a Pony, now in the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery. There is a detailed drawing of the composition in the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven. Ward also painted a portrait of Lord Chesterfield’s niece and daughter.

     

    Lord Stanhope succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Chesterfield in 1815, at the age of 10, the year the related painting was completed. He was passionate about sport including cricket, sailing and in particular horseracing. He had a good eye for bloodstock and his horses won the St Leger, the Oaks and the Grand National on various occasions. A newspaper report about the Earl’s character in the Derby Mercury in 1860 said of him ‘succeeding to a vast fortune and the accumulation of a long minority, under careful trustees, there was none to prevent his Lordship from indulging those tastes for the turf, the chase and the road which seemed born with him and which have since given him such a conspicuous position among the sporting noblemen of the age’. However, his success on the track, was not sufficient to fund his horse racing and by the time he was 30, he had lost nearly half his fortune. Finding himself unable to continue to fund his lavish lifestyle, he retired to Bretby Hall, Derbyshire.

  • Study of Two Donkeys -
    Price on request

    Signed and dated 1810 lower right 
    Oil on laid paper 
    33 by 44.5 cm., 13 by 17½ in. 

    Provenance: 
    Possibly James Ward sale, Christie’s, 29 May 1829, lot 94, as A Spanish Ass, bought by Colburn; 
    Anonymous sale, Sotheby’s, 23 June 1971, lot 7, as Two Donkeys in a Landscape; Private collection, London 

    Exhibited: 
    Possibly Ward’s exhibition of his own work at his home in Newman Street, 1822, no.5, as A Young Ass of the Spanish Breed, the property of the late Thomas Garle, Esq.; Newmarket, Palace House, James Ward - Animal Painter, 4th May to 28th October 2018
  • Trees at Hamilton Palace -
    Price on request

    Signed lower left: JWd RA/August 13/Hamilton Pencil on Whatman paper dated 1801 19.2 by 27.1 cm., 7 ½ by 10 ½ in. 

    Provenance: 
    By descent from the artist to Claude Ward-Jackson; H. Noel Whiting until 1970; With Sidney Sabin; Private Collection, USA until 2007; With Andrew Wyld by 2009; Private Collection 

    Literature: 
    Susan Sloman, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 2009, exhibition catalogue, p.28, no. 16, ill. p.72 

    Exhibited: Andrew Wyld, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 18th November to 11th December 2009, no. 16 

    This drawing dates from Ward’s tour of Scotland in the summer of 1805. He visited Hamilton Palace on 13th August and he recorded in his diary: ‘Got up tolerably well but for my foot, see through Hamilton Palace…. Go down the glen and sketch Cadgow Castle, then my foot so painful I can scarce draw a line. I hobble round to the other side of the river, about three miles away, and make studies. My leg worse and worse, get very feverish with the pain, manage to go round with great difficulty back again to the Palace to draw Hamilton, but find it lost in the fog, return with much pain to the inn…’ (quoted in C.R. Grundy, James Ward RA, His Life and Works with a Catalogue of his Engravings and Pictures, 1909, p. xxxix – Grundy incorrectly dates this trip to 1811)
  • Tintern Abbey from the South, South Wales -
    Price on request

    Signed with initials lower left and inscribed lower right: Tintern 
    Pencil 
    13 by 26.4 cm., 5 by 10 ¼ in. 

    Provenance: 
    With Lowell Libson Ltd, 2013 Literature: Lowell Libson Ltd, Breadth & Quality - Oil studies, Watercolours & Drawings, exhibition catalogue, 2013, p.15, no.6, ill.

    Exhibited: 
    Lowell Libson Ltd, Breadth & Quality - Oil studies, Watercolours & Drawings, exhibition catalogue, 28th June to 12th July 2013, no.6
  • Peak Cavern, Castleton, Derbyshire -
    Price on request

    Signed with initials lower right, extensively inscribed with artist’s shorthand and inscribed on part of old backing: ‘The Peake Cave/looking in, with Rope Walk 
    33.7 by 48.7 cm., 13 ¼ by 19 in. 

    Provenance: 
    Knowles of Hanwell by 1951; Prudence Summerhayes by 1959; By descent until 2008; With Andrew Wyld, 2009; Private Collection 

    Literature: Susan Sloman, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 2009, exhibition catalogue, p.46, no. 45, ill. p.75

    Exhibited: Andrew Wyld, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 18th November to 11th December 2009, no. 45 

    This drawing dates from 1810 to 1815 and is the basis for an oil sketch formerly in the Cochrane collection. This may be the picture exhibited in Ward’s Newman Street gallery in 1841 (Description of Ward’s Gallery, 1841, no.112, p.37) as ‘Looking into the Peak Cavern, Derbyshire.’ Ward noted in the catalogue that ‘The entrance into this cavern, under the shelter of the rocks, is turned into a rope-walk. The immensity of the rocks gives the men the appearance of pygmies; and the high poles erected bear the appearance of so many gibbets’ (op. cit.). Stylistically it relates to a series of studies made for one of Ward’s masterpieces, ‘Gordale Scar’ (Tate Britain) dating from 1814- 15. Peak Cavern is the largest of Derbyshire’s natural caves and was used by ropemakers for well over 500 years and into the mid 20th century. The Duke of Devonshire allowed them to occupy the site rent free with each terrace occupied by one family. In the early nineteenth century, there were forty families mostly living in thatched cottages within the cave (one is seen to the right of this drawing). There were also stables, inns and shops, all of which were demolished in the 1860s. 
  • Study of a Swan landing -
    Price on request

    Signed with intials lower right, with collector's mark verso

    Pencil

    155 x 185 mm., 6 x 7 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance

    Sir John Clement Witt (1907-1982) (Lugt. 2228b)

    By descent until 2017

    This sketch is likely to be a preliminary drawing for Ward’s 1817 Royal Academy exhibit, `Descent of the Swan’, now in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (see C.R. Grundy, James Ward, R.A. – his Life and Works, 1909, p.12 of plates). A related pencil study of swans was recorded in the collection of the Hon. John Ward in 1909 (op. cit., p.20 of plates) and another is in the Tate Gallery (Tate N04987).

    Ward trained under John Raphael Smith as a printmaker, but abandoned a flourishing career in order to take up painting. He rapidly established himself as one of the leading animal painters of the period but his interests were wide-ranging, from portraiture, both animal and human, to history painting, landscapes and studies of nature.

  • A Man and his Dog asleep -
    Sold

    Signed with monogram lower right, inscribed with shorthand upper right and further inscribed lower centre: head ....., pencil

    19 by 27cm., 7 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches

     

    Stylistically this drawing dates from between 1811, when Ward was made a full Royal Academician, and 1825. Ward?s annotated notebooks, which date from 1810 to 1825 and are now in the Royal Academy Library, contain similarly confident drawings. The dog in this drawing may be based on Ward?s painting of Vic, Napoleon?s mastiff (circa 1820) which was captured during the Peninsular War. Ward was the best known animal painter in the early years of the nineteenth century

     

    Provenance:

    With P. & D. Colnaghi, London;

    Bought by Sir David Scott (1887-1986), July 1970;

    By family descent until 2008

  • Study of Meadowsweet -
    Sold

    Signed lower right: JW. RA and inscribed in artist?s shorthand

    Watercolour and pencil

    17.8 by 24.7 cm., 7 by 9 3/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Mr Knowles of Hanwell by 1951;

    Prudence Summerhayes by 1959;

    By descent until 20008

  • Sky Study -
    Sold

    Signed lower left: JW. RA 

    Watercolour

    11.5 by 15.9 cm., 4 1/2 by 6 1/4 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Captain Claude Ward-Jackson;

    H. Noel Whiting until 1970;

    With Sidney Sabin;

    Private Collection, USA until 2007;

    Private Collection, London

     

    Literature:

    Dennis Farr, James Ward 1769-1859, exhibition catalogue, 1960, no. 92, p. 43

     

    Exhibited:

    London, Tate Gallery, and elsewhere, James Ward 1769-1859, 1960, no. 92;

    WS Fine Art Ltd, Drawings by James Ward, 2009, no. 49

  • Figures and Cattle on a Road through a Village -
    Sold

    Signed with initials lower right: JW.RA

    Brown washes and pencil

    211 x 341 mm., 8 ¼ x 13 ¼ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Robert Hyde, his sale, Christie’s, 17th June 1969, lot 69, bt. Sieff;

    Private Collection until 2014  

  • Near Beddgelert, North Wales -
    Sold

    Watercolour over traces of pencil

    8.3 by 13.8 cm., 3 ¼ by 5 ¼ inches

     

     Provenance:

    Iolo Williams;

    Given by his widow to L.G. Duke, 12th February 1964;

    Given to G.B. Mountford, 5th February 1971;

    Given to Anthony Pilcher, 3rd December 1975;

    Anonymous sale, Christie’s, 12th April 1994, lot 77;

    Private Collection, London

     

    Ward first visited Wales in 1802 and then again in 1807. Up to this date, he had generally avoided painting or drawing pure landscapes. An early biography of Ward records that `In 1802 he traversed the length and breadth of Wales and the bordering counties, painting not only the livestock, which was the nominal object of his journey, but recording in his sketch book every picturesque or uncommon object that he encountered. As the fruits of his three months’ Welsh tour he brought back with him five hundred and eighty one sketches from Nature’ (C. Reginald Grundy, James Ward, R.A., 1909, p.32).

  • Neath looking towards Pontneddfechan, North Wales -
    Sold

    Signed lower left: JWd RA/Neath looking to Pontnevaughan

    Pencil on wove paper watermarked: 1801/J WHATMAN

    20 by 37.3 cm., 7 ¾ by 14 ½ in.

     

    Provenance:

    Knowles of Hanwell by 1951;

    Prudence Summerhayes by 1959;

    By descent until 2008;

    With WS Fine Art, 2009;

    Private Collection

     

    Literature:

    Susan Sloman, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 2009, exhibition catalogue, p.43, no. 42, ill. p.75

     

    Exhibited:

    WS Fine Art, Drawings by James Ward 1769-1859, 18th November to 11th December 2009,  no. 42

     

    Pontneddfechan stands on the confluence of the Mellte and Need Fechan rivers in the vale of Neath. The word means `bridge over the Little Neath’ in English. Ward’s inscription reads `Pontnevaughan’ – Pontneathvaughan is a nineteenth century word for Pontneddfechan.

     

Thumbnail panels:
Now Loading