• The artist's Cutter `Snail' beached by a Pier -
    Price on request

    Inscribed upper centre: Snail Cutter.

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid Whatman paper

    28.7 by 18 cm., 11 1/4 by 7 in.

     

    Gore was a knowledgeable sailor and keen amateur shipbuilder. He designed several boats and the `Snail' was a cutter that he designed and had built whilst living in Southampton. He accompanied the Royal Navy on annual manoeuvres and its handling and design proved so successful that the Royal Navy adopted Gore's improvements for their own small, fast vessels.

     

    The `Snail' was a small cutter-rigged pleasure yacht. The hull is clearly clinker construction, not plank-on-frame carvel, as in the larger coastal trader shown on the left which is under maintenance or painting from temporary platforms hung over the bow. The Snail's legs would have been bolted on when moored in tidal harbours so that it settled upright as shown given its profile. Broad-bottomed vessels like that to the left could heel over safely at low tide but those like Snail, which tip right over without the legs, too easily swamp if the tide comes in over their gunwales before they unstick from the mud. Such legs are still widely used today with deep-keel boats that won't settle more or less upright.

  • Small trading Vessels beached and drying sails at low tide by Jersey pier -
    Price on request

    Inscribed upper centre: Jersey Pier 

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour on two sheets of laid paper joined

    28.4 by 19.4 cm., 11 by 7 3/4 in.

     

    In her biography of her father's life, Emily recollected that whilst the family was living in Southampton, between 1757 and 1773, Gore spent time sailing around the coast of Britain, visiting the Channel Islands and the northern French coast on several occasions and the present work would have been executed during one of these visits.

     

    The drawing depicts cutter-rigged sloops with carved work at the stem-head and seem to be of carvel (smooth-hull) plank-on-frame construction, not clinker.

     

    There is a drawing in Weimar which is inscribed `Snail cutter taken in camera Jersey 1773'.

  • The Harbour at Civitavecchia, Italy -
    Price on request

    Inscribed upper centre: Civita Vecchia

    Pen and grey ink and grey washes over pencil on laid paper watermarked JKOOL

    21.2 by 37.3 cm., 8 1/4 by 14 1/2 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

     

    Civitavecchia lies about 50 miles west of Rome on the Tyrrhenian Sea and serves as the port of Rome. The harbour was first founded by Emperor Trajan at the beginning of the 2nd Century. The Forte Michelangelo on the left of the drawing, was begun in 1508 and completed in 1535 on the site of a large Roman structure. Mainly designed by Donato Bramante (1444-1514) under the patronage of Pope Julius II, to protect the town from pirates, the upper part of the Maschio Tower was built by Michelangelo, after whom the fort was named. The lighthouse, seen in the centre of the drawing, was built in 1616 and stood until it was destroyed during World War II. Gore would have visited the town frequently on his trips around the Italian coast.

     

    This shows fishing boats to left and a small warship (presumably belonging to the Papal States) with yards struck down to the right.

     

  • The Aeolian Islands off Sicily -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    13.5 by 29.8 cm., 5 1/4 by 11 3/4 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Sir Bruce Ingram (1877-1953) (Lugt. No. 1405a);

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

    The present drawing shows the group of volcanic islands off the northern coast of Sicily, that make up the Aeolian or Lipari archipelago including Stomboli, Lipari, Vulcano, Salina, Filicudi, Alicudi and Panarea. In the centre of the composition is Strombol, nicknamed the ?lighthouse of the Mediterranean, for its constant towering glow. Stromboli has been almost constantly active for the past 2500 years.

     

    Gore visited the islands in the company of Richard Payne Knight and Philipp  Hackert in the spring of 1777. There are two further views of the islands, formerly in Payne Knight's collection, now in the British Museum and a further 12 in the collection of the Schlossmuseum, Weimar.

     

    From its flat profile, the vessel to the left appears to be a war galley making passage under sail and probably from one of the Italian states (most likely the Kingdom of Naples), with a lateen trader to the right.

  • A Cutter off a rocky Islet, with other Shipping in the Distance -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    19.3 by 47.3 cm., 7 3/4 by 18 1/2 in.

     

    The present drawing may depict Porto Venere on the Ligurian coast of Italy, although the landscape beyond would be rather hillier than that shown here. There is a drawing by Gore in the British Museum, which appears to show the same hilly outcrop with buildings, which is inscribed with the location.

     

    The boat looks like an English cutter and perhaps a yacht, possibly the Snail but it looks more substantial, with a topmast and full square `course'. A two-masted lugger is sketched in unfinished to the left.

  • The Triumphal Arch at Orange, France -
    Price on request

    Inscribed lower centre: Triumphal Arch of Orange. Erected by Marcus (??) & Catulus from the Victory over the Cimbri & Teutons

    Watercolour over pencil on laid paper watermarked GR, with collector's mark verso

    11 by 24.5 cm., 4 1/4 by 9 1/2 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Sir Bruce Ingram (1877-1953) (Lugt. No. 1405a);

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

     

    The Gallo-Roman arch at Orange, is the largest and oldest surviving arch of the period and has been classified a UNESCO world heritage site. Its design was subsequently used in Rome, with the Arches of Constantine and Septimus Severus. It was constructed between A.D. 10-25 during the reign of Augustus and was first dedicated to the glory of the veteran armies and then to Emperor Tiberius. It stood on the Via Agrippa and marked a border between the world of the dead and the Roman city of Orange.

  • Isola Bella on Lake Maggiore, Italy -
    Price on request

    Signed lower right: Lac Magiore Isola Bella vue du Cote du Sud en entrant dans la Bage venant de Seste. 1795 C Gor., inscribed upper centre: Lago Maggiore and further inscribed lower left

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper watermarked with a fleur de lys, with a pen and black in border

    15.8 by 31.4 cm., 6 1/4 by 12 1/4 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

    In March 1774, Charles Gore and family settled in Italy, where they were to remain for the next four years, staying largely in Rome but travelling extensively throughout the region and undertaking frequent lengthy cruises along the Ligurian and Tyrrhenian coasts. Gore returned to Italy again in the summer of 1794 travelling around the Italian Lakes and to Naples.

     

    Isola Bella is the largest of the islands in Lake Maggiore, owned by the Borromeo family. Initially a rocky outcrop inhabited by fishermen and with two small churches, Carlo III began an ambitious building programme to create a palazzo in 1632. Work continued under subsequent generations developing and expanding the palace and large terraced pleasure gardens.

     

    There is a watercolour showing the island from a distance, also dated 1795, in the British Museum and a further watercolour showing the island from a similar angle in the Yale Center for British Art.

  • Italian coastal View with boats and a trading xebec and a Fort approached by a causeway Bridge in the distance -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper watermarked JKOOL

    27.5 by 44.8 cm., 10 3/4 by 17 1/2 in.

     

    This may be a view of Mount Etna on Sicily with Catania to the left.

  • A Weyschuit coming ashore under the shelter of a groyne on the Dutch coast: Study after van de Velde the Younger -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on grey-blue laid paper

    Sheet 18.1 by 28.8 cm., 7 by 11 1/4 in.


    The single masted boat, sprit-rigged with a loose-footed sail and leeboards, is a Dutch weyschuit. Its appearance, including the raised sail and associated figures, is very similar to an oil by van de Velder titled, A fishing pink hauled up on the beach in a moderate breeze near a groyne on the Dutch coast, now in the Fondation Custodia, Institution Neerlandais, Paris. During the 18th Century the painting was at Gopsall Hall, Leicestershire, so Gore may well have seen the painting, or a related drawing (some of which are now in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich).

  • A Frigate anchored close inshore in a stiff breeze, with three Cutters and a three men in a Rowing Boat trying to push off into the Wind -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on blue laid paper

    12.5 by 27.3 cm., 5 by 10 ? in.

  • The Burning of the `Royal James' at the Battle of Solebay, 7th June 1672 - a study after Willem van de Velde, the Younger -
    Price on request

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper 
    19 by 30.4 cm., 7 3/4 by 12 in. 

    The present drawing is a study after a painting by Willem van de Velde the Younger (1644-1703) in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich (NMM BHC0302). Van de Velde explored the subject in a number of versions, as well as in preparatory drawings, one of which closely mirrors the present composition, also in the National Maritime Museum (NMM PA17272). In the battle of Solebay during the Third Dutch War, the Admiral of the English Fleet, Edward Montagu, 1st Earl Sandwich, commanded the navy from aboard the Royal James, a three-deck, 100-gun vessel. It was set alight during the battle and Montagu was drowned whilst trying to move his flag to another vessel. The ship in the centre of this work is the Royal James, with Sandwich's flag flying at the main. The small vessel next to the Royal James is the Dutch fireship Vrede, under the command of Jan van Rijn. The boats pencilled in to the right of the Vrede, may be her crew making their escape. The English crew are abandoning the ship, over the bow where there are waiting boats. The flag on the foremast of the ship at right (despite being blue) is the Dutch tricolor of Vice-Admiral Isaac Sweerts on the Oliphant. 
  • Shipping in Rough Seas, possibly after the Van de Veldes -
    Price on request

    Pen and brown ink and washes over pencil on laid paper

    Sheet 18 by 34 cm., 7 by 13 ? in.

     

    Gore appears to have collected a number of drawings and watercolours by the Van de Veldes, although, it seems that initially, he was more interested in the subject matter, than in their artistic value. This is evidenced by the fact that he often overworked the slighter sketches and studies. Some of this overworking, is rather clumsy and lacks sophistication, suggesting that these were undertaken earlier in his career. Others, however, are more accomplished which suggests that he continued his practice of overworking over a long period. He has often been criticised for this overworking, which is sometimes so extensive that it is difficult to tell the original drawing underneath. However, his relationship with the earlier artists is clearly more sophisticated, as there are also a number of copies of works by the Van de Veldes, which indicates that Gore, like so many of his contemporaries was profoundly influenced by their artistic accomplishment, particularly in their handling of pen and ink and served also as models for ?the development of his personal style? (p. 379).

  • Resolution Bay, Marquesas Islands -
    Price on request

    Inscribed upper right: Baye de la Resolution Isle des Marquis and similarly inscribed on mount

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper, with pen and black in border

    13.3 by 27.7 cm., 5 1/4 by 10 3/4 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

    Gore although well-travelled through Europe, never ventured further afield and in the present drawing, he has taken inspiration from Benjamin Thomas Pouncy?s engraving of William Hodges' drawing of the islanders of Resolution Bay, wearing woven grass head-dresses, in their long canoes. Looking at work by artists who had travelled further afield, was not uncommon at the time, many maritime artists such as John and Robert Cleveley, drew on the works of others.

     

    William Hodges (1744-1797) joined Cook's second expedition to the South Pacific between 1772-5, as a draughtsman. Cook travelled to the Marquesas in March of 1774. John Hawkesworth's account of 1773, for which Pouncy's engraving was made, records that the islanders' canoes were made of wood and pieces of the Bark of a soft wood, which grows near the Sea in great plenty, and is very tough and proper for the purpose; They are from 16 to 20 feet long and about 15 inches broad. The head and stern is made of two pieces of Wood, the Stern rises or curves a little, but in an irregular direction and ends in a point; the head projects out horizontally and is car[v]ed into some faint and very rude resemblance of a human face. They are rowed by Paddles and some have a sort of Latteen sail made of Mating.' (Cook, Journals II, 12 April 1774). The ship in the centre is Cook's Resolution.

     

  • Distant view of Genoa on a stormy day -
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    Pen and grey ink and wash over pencil on laid paper watermarked with a fleur de lys
    22.9 by 37.8cm., 8 by 14 inches
  • A fortified Bay on the Italian Coast, with lateen rigged Vessels and three small Ships -
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    Indistinctly inscribed upper centre

    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    12.6 by 37 cm., 5 by 14 1/2 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

  • View looking towards Genoa -
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    Pen and grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper

    21.8 by 44.4 cm., 8 1/2 by 17 1/2 in.

     

    There is a view by William Brockedon, (1787-1854) in the Yale Center for British Art, which appears to depicts the same subject from a slightly different angle, inscribed `View of Genoa, from the heights near Spinturno'

  • Isola dei Pescatori, Lake Maggiore, Italy -
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    Inscribed upper centre: Isola Peschiera. Lago Maggiore

    Pen, grey ink and watercolour over pencil on laid paper, with collectors mark on reverse of mount

    10.2 by 24.8 cm., 4 by 9 3/4 in.

     

    Provenance:

    Sir Bruce Ingram (1877-1953) (Lugt. No. 1405a);

    Michael Ingram (1917-2005)

     

    Isola Pescatori or Superiore lies to the north of Isola Bella and is the only permanently inhabited of the Borromean Islands. The spire of the 11th church of San Vittore can be seen rising above the roofs of the village.

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